Barry Maxwell

Barry Maxwell




Barry Maxwell teaches Comparative Literature and American Studies at Cornell University, where he helped to put together the Institute for Comparative Modernities. He has written about Frederick Douglass, Walt Whitman, Kenneth Burke, Ernst Bloch, Walter Benjamin, David Hammons, Sun Ra, Miles Davis, Gwendolyn Brooks, and Nathaniel Mackey.








No Gods, No Masters, No Peripheries: Global Anarchisms

No Gods, No Masters, No Peripheries: Global Anarchisms

SKU: 9781629630984
Editors: Raymond Craib and Barry Maxwell
Publisher: PM Press
ISBN: 9781629630984
Published: 6/2015
Format: Paperback, ePub, PDF, mobi
Size: 6 x 9
Page count: 408
Subjects: Politics-Anarchism



Praise

“Broad in scope, generously ecumenical in outlook, bold in its attempt to tease apart the many threads and tensions of anarchism, this collection defies borders and category. These illuminating explorations in pan-anarchism provide a much-needed antidote to the myopic characterizations that bedevil the red and black.”
—Sasha Lilley, author of Capital and Its Discontents

“This wonderful collection challenges the privileging of Europe as the original and natural laboratory in which anti-statist ideas developed as well as the belief that anarchism and Communism could not intersect in fruitful ways. Drawing on non-Western locations (from Latin America, the Middle East, North Africa, and South Asia) its authors demonstrate how antiauthoritarian movements engaged with both local and global currents to construct a new emancipatory politics—proving that anarchy and anarchism have always been global.”
—Barry Carr, La Trobe University

“This magnificent collection of essays coincides with an awakening of interest in global anarchism. A quirky, exciting, and imaginative collection, No Gods, No Masters, No Peripheries is bound to become a cornerstone of reference for activists and academics.”
—Andrej Grubacic, chair of the Anthropology and Social Change Department at the California Institute of Integral Studies

“Ranging from Kabylie to Oakland, Cairo to Peru, and across the uneven span of a century and a half, these essays register an ongoing and collective effort to deprovincialise our image of anarchism—a movement long buried in cliché and caricature by friends and enemies alike. In these pages, the reader will encounter some of the ways in which the dreams of the dead might dispel the nightmares that continue to plague the brains of the living.”
—Alberto Toscano, Reader in Critical Theory, Goldsmiths, University of London


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